Traffic comes to a standstill along Interstate 25 Friday, Feb. 20, 2015, in downtown Denver.

(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Colorado voters could be asked next year to approve a road-funding bond measure worth $3.5 billion.

A coalition of business groups called Fix Colorado Roads first has to persuade the Legislature to put the measure on the ballot. They kicked off their effort Friday, arguing that bad roads are bad for Colorado’s economy. 

"We know that there are people who make decisions whether to travel into the mountains based on the travel time. On the Interstate 25 corridor we know that there’s been an economic loss from the congestion that’s found throughout that corridor," said Sandra Hagen Solin of Fix Colorado Roads.

Hagen Solin also says their polling shows most Coloradans want better roads, but without new taxes. 

"There’s a desire on the part of the voters to see that their government has done all it can to deliver on transportation before they dig into their pockets," she said. 

The measure also calls for about $80 million a year from the state’s general fund to be added to gas-tax revenues to pay for road projects. A transportation bond issue failed earlier this year in the last legislative session.