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  1. 15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer?

    The mass shooting at Columbine High School spurred schools to adopt "zero tolerance" policies. Do they work? NPR Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez and former principal Bill Bond discuss.
    News · NPR Story
  2. 'Pandemic' Asks: Is A Disease That Will Kill Tens Of Millions Coming?

    Author Sonia Shah says that urbanization and air travel put the global population at an increased risk for disease. "Zika is a great example of how new pathogens are emerging today," she says.
    News · NPR Story
  3. Colorado Pushes For Concealed Guns In K-12 Schools

    Similar legislation has been proposed in North Dakota and Wyoming to allow concealed firearms on K-12 school grounds and college campuses, as a part of a larger effort to expand gun owners' rights.
    News · NPR Story
  4. Tens Of Thousands Of Verizon Workers Go On Strike

    Nearly 40,000 union workers on the East Coast, who haven't had a contract since August, have walked out. Among other things, they object to outsourcing and two-month location transfers of employees.
    News · NPR Story
  5. 5 Years After Devastating Missouri Tornado, Communities Assesses Disaster Response

    Five years ago, a massive tornado ripped through Joplin, Mo., killing 161 people. This week, Joplin will host leaders from other tornado-stricken cities to discuss the lessons they've learned.
    News · NPR Story
  6. After 50-Year Legal Struggle, Mississippi School District Ordered To Desegregate

    The town of Cleveland is divided by a railroad track — and its schools are divided by race. For 50 years, the district has said it will fix the problem; a judge says the schools will have to merge.
    News · NPR Story
  7. After 40-Year Detour, 'Squidbillies' Voiceover Actor Graduates College

    Bobby Ellerbee tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer that he bonded with his much-younger University of Georgia classmates over the cartoon "Squidbillies," on which he voices the sheriff.
    News · NPR Story
  8. Sherpas First To Climb Mount Everest After 2 Years Of Avalanches

    This week nine Sherpas became the first to climb Mt. Everest since a deadly avalanche in 2014 and an earthquake last year. The guides hope more climbers return to the slopes.
    News · NPR Story
  9. Slovenia Closes Its Border, Stranding Tens Of Thousands Of Migrants

    Following Slovenia's border restrictions, Serbia and Croatia also closed their frontiers to most migrants trying to reach Europe through the Balkans.
    News · NPR Story
  10. One Year After Fatal Amtrak Derailment, Still Waiting For Answers

    The National Transportation Safety Board has scheduled a meeting next week to detail the probable cause of the accident, which killed 8 people and injured more than 200.
    News · NPR Story

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