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  1. Columbine parent: After trauma, survival is possible

    In the wake of last week's shooting at Arapahoe High School, a trauma expert who's child was a student at Columbine during the shooting in 1999 offers advice and guidance.
    News · Story
  2. For The Formerly Obese, Stigma Remains After Weight Is Lost

    People who have lost significant weight are uneasy about revealing that in online dating profiles, because obesity is often judged as a moral failing. Research shows they have good reason to worry.
    News · NPR Story
  3. Ancient Viruses Lurk In Frozen Caribou Poo

    A 700-year-old caribou dropping from northern Canada holds surprisingly well-preserved viruses. There's no evidence the viruses are dangerous, but they are scientifically interesting.
    News · NPR Story
  4. State: 'Rabbit fever' cases spiking; hunters should take care

    The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment now says 12 people have been infected by a bacterial disease called tularemia.
    News · Story
  5. Safety report ranks Colorado hospitals 10th in nation

    Thirty-eight percent of Colorado hospitals earned "A" grades.
    News · Story
  6. Colorado healthcare system preps for surge of seniors

    The “senior tsunami” is set to stretch the state’s social safety net, raising questions about who will care for a greying Colorado.
    News · Story
  7. Colorado health insurance subsides dropping

    Many will have to pay more, or shop for a new plan or a new insurer.
    News · Story
  8. More women skip prenatal tests after learning about risks

    Research suggests that women may not be getting the information they need to make informed decisions about prenatal genetic testing, particularly invasive tests that can harm the fetus.
    News · NPR Story
  9. Colorado mental health hotline ramping up services

    The line is now getting about 225 calls a day since it launched this summer.
    News · Story
  10. New studies: Colo. uninsured need more specifics of costs, services

    The new studies find the uninsured include so-called "young invincibles," those 18 to 34, Latinos and seasonal workers.
    News · Story

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