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  1. Presidential Apologies: Regrets, They Have A Few

    The recent history of White House apologies teaches us a lesson: Being president means never having to say you're sorry. At least not in a convincing, soulful, direct way.
    News · NPR Story
  2. It's A New Orleans Mantra, But Using 'Who Dat' May Cost You

    Residents say the phrase "Who Dat" is part and parcel of New Orleans culture. The chant opens Saints football games and "Who Dat" can now be found on T-shirts and storefronts throughout the city. But a Texas company says it owns the ubiquitous phrase — and recently filed a lawsuit to stake its claim.
    News · NPR Story
  3. In Vermont, A Wild Game Church Supper Feeds The Multitudes

    How about a nice, juicy moose burger with your venison? Wild game suppers are a rural American harvest tradition dating back to Colonial times. This year, 800 people turned out for the long-running "superbowl" of these suppers, where hunters donate most of the meat (with some roadkill thrown in.)
    News · NPR Story
  4. Homeless Veteran's Makeover Goes Viral: VIDEO

    Millions have watched as Jim Wolf is transformed. The scruffy vet becomes a stylish looking guy. The video's producer says he wants people to view the homeless differently.
    News · NPR Story
  5. Judge Orders Sriracha Factory To Cool It

    In Irwindale, Calif., city officials were peppered with complaints about smells coming from the hot sauce factory. Now a judge has said the plant must partially shut down while the company and authorities try to address the problem.
    News · NPR Story
  6. In Rural Iowa, Distance Makes Health Care Sign-Ups A Challenge

    Right now, there are about a dozen full-time navigators and a few part-timers to help 200,000 Iowans make decisions about health insurance. In the countryside, it's particularly hard to get help to people who want it.
    News · NPR Story
  7. Project Xpat: No Tinned Pumpkin

    In England, Thanksgiving sometimes calls for innovation.
    News · NPR Story
  8. 2 Summer Olympic Cities Are Chasing The 2022 Winter Games

    Beijing and Stockholm, Sweden, are vying to become the first city to have hosted both summer and winter Olympics. They're among six cities that submitted bids by Thursday's deadline.
    News · NPR Story
  9. Western Media In China: Living With The 'Anaconda'

    Staffers at Bloomberg News accused editors of spiking an investigative story to avoid the wrath of the Communist Party. But experts say accusations of self-censorship go far beyond this one case. One American academic compares China's censorial authority to a "giant anaconda" — its mere presence enough to make people limit their behavior.
    News · NPR Story
  10. Internal Emails Reveal Warnings HealthCare.gov Wasn't Ready

    "When we pull back the curtain now, the mess is disturbing," says House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., of the latest revelations. These documents call into question whether contractors can fix the website as promised by the end of November.
    News · NPR Story

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