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  1. Publishing Magazines For An 'Ambidextrous' Generation

    The American Reader is a year old. The monthly literary journal is online and in print, but co-founder Uzoamaka Maduka says "it's all one magazine." The publication's staff has faith that readers want "deeper engagement" and strong editing, and they're hoping the free online content will entice their audience to pay for more.
    News · NPR Story
  2. Foreign Workers Abused In Qatar, Report Says

    The workers, mostly South Asian, are building the infrastructure for soccer's World Cup, which is being held in the country in 2022. Amnesty International says laborers are working in extreme conditions and are treated "like cattle."
    News · NPR Story
  3. Charter Schools In Philadelphia: Educating Without A Blueprint

    A few short years ago, Simon Gratz in North Philadelphia was among the state's most troubled, violent and academically underachieving high schools. Today, now a charter school, Gratz is very much on the rebound. But critics say Philadelphia can't charter its way out of its school crisis.
    News · NPR Story
  4. GOP Family Feud: 'Showboat' DeMint Takes on 'Tyrant' McConnell

    The Senate Conservatives Fund, founded by then-Sen. Jim DeMint, is a big-money player targeting incumbent Republican senators including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.
    News · NPR Story
  5. Chile Election: Bachelet Is Far Ahead But Will Face Runoff

    Michelle Bachelet, the former president of Chile from 2006 to 2010, is well on her way to an encore. A runoff election is set for Dec. 15, where she will face off against her childhood friend Evelyn Matthei.
    News · NPR Story
  6. New York City's Fire Commissioner On Extinguishing Racial Gap

    Two years after a federal judge ruled that New York City's fire department's tests discriminated against blacks and Hispanics, nearly 62 percent of graduates from the most recent class of the FDNY's training academy are minorities.
    News · NPR Story
  7. Police: British Spy's Strange Death Was 'Probably An Accident'

    Scotland Yard says it believes Gareth Williams, whose naked and decomposing body was found locked inside a gym bag in 2010, was not murdered.
    News · NPR Story
  8. Plan Calls For Syria's Chemical Arsenal To Be Destroyed At Sea

    The world wants Syria's chemical arsenal destroyed. But so far, no country has offered to do the dirty work on its soil. Over the past week, an alternative has gained ground: Carry out the destruction at sea. The plan taking shape is complicated and untested, but it just might work.
    News · NPR Story
  9. Despite Early Stages, Alzheimer's Affects Couple's Big Picture

    Winston and Pansy Greene are getting on with their lives despite Pansy's Alzheimer's disease. In the three years since her diagnosis, little has changed, though the couple is starting to have different takes on the future. Pansy has remained positive; Winston says with no cure, he has to be realistic.
    News · NPR Story
  10. The Enigmatic Pecan: Why So Pricey, And How To Pronounce It?

    The weather and demand from China are driving prices up. But how do you say the word pecan? NPR's Melissa Block gets answers from a pecan farmer and a linguistics expert.
    News · NPR Story

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