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  1. U.S. Military Lingo: The (Almost) Definitive Guide

    What's a fobbit? How about rumint? And then there's a self-licking ice cream cone. A dozen years of war in Afghanistan and Iraq have spawned a whole new military vocabulary.
    News · NPR Story
  2. Why Chaucer Said 'Ax' Instead Of 'Ask,' And Why Some Still Do

    People often question why some pronounce the word "ask" as "ax." We axed several linguists, and it turns out that "ax" has long been an accepted form of the word, used by English speakers for more than a thousand years.
    News · NPR Story
  3. Washington State Growers Roll The Dice On New Pot Licenses

    The deadline to apply to legally grow and sell pot is coming up in Washington State, but growers are finding there are pros and cons to going legit. Applicants must invest big money to qualify for a license, and it's unclear what the new system will mean for existing medical growers.
    News · NPR Story
  4. Want A File From The NSA? You Can Ask, But You Might Not Get It

    Legally, you're allowed to request any record from government agencies, and people are using that right, with gusto, for NSA files. But it's up to agencies to decide which information they will hand over. Here are some examples of records that the NSA has released, when asked, in the past.
    News · NPR Story
  5. In The Philippines, Signs Of Hope As Relief Efforts Pick Up

    The death toll has edged up, but an international relief effort is delivering much needed aid to hard-hit and hard-to-reach areas. A little over a week after a typhoon devastated parts of the country, victims also took solace at Sunday services.
    News · NPR Story
  6. Slashing Fossil Fuel Consumption Comes With A Price

    The U.S. aims to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Wind and solar power can help. But folks doing the math say other pricey, controversial technologies — such as burying carbon gas underground, and expanding nuclear power — are also likely to be part of a low-carbon future.
    News · NPR Story
  7. Colo. insurance commissioner says 'canceled' health policies not necessarily canceled

    Commissioner Margeurite Salazar says not every Coloradan who's received a letter from their insurance company saying their health policy is ending is necessarily being dropped.
    News · Story
  8. Overweight And Healthy: A Combo That Looks Too Good To Be True

    The proposition that some extra weight may not be a health worry has sparked a heated medical debate. Some studies have found that a little extra fat might have benefits. A new analysis suggests that for almost all people excess weight increases the risk of death and disease.
    News · NPR Story
  9. Mushroom Foraging: When The Fun(gi) Hunt Gets Out Of Hand

    Foraging for fungi and other wild edibles has grown in popularity in the U.S. and abroad in recent years, fueled by guidebooks, Internet buzz and hype from chefs. As a result, some known mushroom hunting grounds are taking a beating.
    News · NPR Story
  10. Income gap still affects education gap for Denver Public Schools

    The report also found Denver students are better prepared for college than they were four years ago, but nearly all the gains came from more affluent students.
    News · Story

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