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  1. Federal Judge Rules Kentucky Must Recognize Gay Marriages

    The decision strikes down parts of Kentucky's ban on gay marriage. The state attorney general is weighing whether to appeal the decision.
    News · NPR Story
  2. Job Seekers Still Have To Hide Tattoos (From The Neck Up)

    Twenty percent of adults and nearly 40 percent of young people have at least one tattoo, but most keep them covered. Despite increased popularity and acceptance, employers just don't want to see them.
    News · NPR Story
  3. A Strong Sex Life Helps Couples Cope With The Trials Of Aging

    Everybody knows a healthy sex life is important for a good marriage. But keeping the spark in the bedroom may be even more crucial for older couples dealing with chronic illness.
    News · NPR Story
  4. Is Tyson Foods' Chicken Empire A 'Meat Racket'?

    Investigative journalist Chris Leonard argues in a new book that Tyson's system of chicken production treats farmers like "modern-day sharecroppers." The book is a detailed account of the inner workings of Tyson, and the not-so-independent farmers who actually raise the birds.
    News · NPR Story
  5. Global Military Spending Set To Rise In 2014

    For the first time in five years, worldwide military spending is expected to go up, with China and Russia leading the way. The U.S. military budget is facing pressure, but the $600 billion in annual spending is roughly the same as the next 14 countries combined.
    News · NPR Story
  6. 2014: The Year We're Not Shocked People Of Color Watch Films?

    The makers of Paranormal Activity are releasing two movies this year. One, which dropped in theaters this Friday, had Latino themes and characters. Does this mark a shift in narratives?
    News · NPR Story
  7. Maker Of $1,000 Hepatitis C Pill Looks To Cut Its Cost Overseas

    The U.S. recently approved a drug that can quickly cure hepatitis C in many patients. But its high price means the treatment is out of reach for millions of people in the developing world. Now the pill's manufacturer is talking with Indian producers to reduce the treatment cost to $2,000. But critics say the price drop won't be enough.
    News · NPR Story
  8. Help-Wanted Ad Shows Depths Of Spain's Unemployment Problem

    Having trouble wrapping your head around southern Europe's staggering unemployment problem? This week, Ikea advertised for 400 jobs in a new megastore on Spain's Mediterranean coast. It got more than 20,000 online applicants in 48 hours, before the retailer's computer servers crashed.
    News · NPR Story
  9. As Mandela Lies In State, South Africa Says Goodbye

    South Africans are paying their respects at a hilltop amphitheater in Pretoria, the spot where Mandela was sworn in as the country's first black president nearly 20 years ago. Hundreds of thousands of people, perhaps millions, are expected to come over the next three days.
    News · NPR Story
  10. U.S. Olympic Officials: It Wasn't Suits That Hurt Speed Skaters

    U.S. Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun praised U.S. athletes for their performance at Sochi and said that the problem with US Speedskating wasn't the Under Armour suits.
    News · NPR Story

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