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  1. South Sudan Signs Cease-Fire With Rebels

    The agreement is aimed at ending five weeks of bloodshed that has claimed more than 10,000 lives. It is hoped the deal is a first step toward a broader peace agreement in the world's newest country.
    News · NPR Story
  2. Antarctic Travelers Who Got Stuck In Ice Finally Get Home

    The 52 scientists and paying passengers were aboard a ship that got stuck in the ice on Christmas Eve. It was about 10 days before they were helicoptered to another ship nearby. Who will pay the $2 million or so it cost to rescue the group? That's being negotiated.
    News · NPR Story
  3. An Unconventional Contender Emerges As GOP Ponders 2016 Convention

    Las Vegas may seem to be an unlikely place for Republicans to gather to nominate their next presidential candidate. That's exactly why city leaders are getting such a head start on their pitch to do just that.
    News · NPR Story
  4. Loud & Clear: Boycotts and Secession

    News · Story
  5. Billionaire Compares Outrage Over Rich In S.F. To Kristallnacht

    As class tensions intensify in the Bay Area, a venture capitalist is comparing the treatment of the tech-affluent to that of the Jews during a deadly raid in the Holocaust.
    News · NPR Story
  6. Colorado pianist champions minimalist classical music one chord at a time

    Regis University piano instructor R. Andrew Lee is winning over critics and international audiences.
    News · Story
  7. At Least 3 People Killed In 40-Vehicle Pileup In Indiana

    More than 20 others were injured in the massive accident along a snowy stretch of Interstate 94 about 60 miles east of Chicago.
    News · NPR Story
  8. Can This 'Perfect Match' Dance Their Way To Gold?

    No U.S. skating team has ever won Olympic gold in ice dancing. Some experts wonder whether it even qualifies as a sport. But Americans Meryl Davis and Charlie White, known for their blend of athletic power, speed and flair, are helping to dispel that notion.
    News · NPR Story
  9. Silencing many hospital alarms leads to better health care

    Alarms are good and necessary things in hospital care — except when there are so many that caregivers miss signals of a patient in crisis. Trying to conquer "alarm fatigue," one hospital turned off the beeps — and found that patient care actually improved.
    News · NPR Story
  10. Can President Obama Get Back In The Game After Health Care 'Fumble'?

    President Obama admitting to fumbling the ball on the healthcare website. But is 'sorry' enough - or does someone have to be sidelined? Host Michel Martin talks to the Barbershop guys about the week's news. Writer Jimi Izrael, Corey Dade of The Root, law professor Paul Butler and healthcare consultant Neil Minkoff weigh in.
    News · NPR Story

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