CPR News Reporter and Producer
Sarah Hughes

Education: Bachelor’s degree, world literature, University of California-Santa Cruz; special studies in Spanish Literature, University of Alcala de Henares, Spain; special studies in African literature,University of Cape Town, South Africa; Master’s degree in journalism, University of California-Berkeley.Professional Background: Sarah, who is fluent in Spanish, worked as a bilingual elementary school teacher in California for the Teach for America program from 1995-1997. In 1997, she entered the Master of Journalism program at UC Berkeley and studied under former New York Times South American bureau chief Lydia Chavez and Bill Drummond, founding editor of NPR’s “Morning Edition.” A month after completing the program, she boarded a plane for Alaska, where she spent the next year and a half covering stories about natural resource debates and local politics for two local public radio stations there. From 2001 to early 2007, Sarah worked as a general assignment reporter with a special focus on education and immigration for WAMU in Washington D.C. In 2007, she moved to Colorado and reported on immigration for Aspen Public Radio. In 2008 and 2009, she worked as a Denver-based freelance reporter, traveling to Peru and Argentina for international media exchange and research projects, and founded a radio project for Colorado teenagers, called Colorado Youth News.Awards, Fellowships, Media Exchange Programs and Reporting Conferences: Socrates Society Fellowship, The Aspen Institute, Summer 2009; PCI-Media Impact International Exchange Project in Peru, Spring 2008; Philip Merrill College of Journalism Fellowship for Journalists in Child and Family Policy, 2003; Best Spot News Coverage, Washington D.C. AIR Awards, “D.C. After the Control Board,” 2001; Reporting on Immigration Conference, Harvard University, 1999. In her own words …Why I became a journalist: I became a journalist because I enjoy working for the public and I enjoy researching community issues; journalism gives me the opportunity to pursue both of these passions.Why I got into radio: I started the UC Berkeley Master of Journalism program with the goal of learning how to write for magazines. I took a radio class on a whim. My very first assignment was to capture the sounds of a community sing-along at a local Irish pub. By the end of the evening, I had captured some magical interviews and songs on tape, and I was hooked. That was back in 1997, and I’ve been working in radio ever since.How I ended up at CPR: I have covered several education and immigration stories for CPR as a freelance reporter. I also know CPR through my work as director of the Colorado Youth News (CYN) project. CYN is a radio storytelling project for teenagers, and several of the pieces that I produced have aired on CPR. [ Previous ] [ Back to List ] [ Next ]

  • In the session that just wrapped up, state lawmakers cut funding to K-12  schools, gave colleges and universities greater flexibility to raise tuition, and redefined the job security of Colorado’s public school teachers. Todd Engdahl, the capitol editor for the online news site, Education News Colorado, shares more details with Ryan Warner.
  • Several political candidates in Colorado are taking bold positions on immigration. This is after Arizona passed the strictest immigration law in the country. Arizona’s law makes it a crime to not  carry immigration papers, and it requires police to detain people whom they suspect are undocumented immigrants.
  • Several political candidates in Colorado are taking bold positions on immigration. This is after Arizona passed the strictest immigration law in the country. Arizona’s law makes it a crime to NOT carry immigration papers, and it requires police to detain people whom they suspect are undocumented immigrants.
  • A new study says kids who live in poor neighborhoods have 20 to 60% higher odds of being overweight or obese than kids in richer neighborhoods.  There are a lot of reasons for that.
  • A program in Littleton – and the city’s residents – are helping immigrants from all over in the process to become U.S. citizens. Sarah Hughes reports for KCFR News. Immigrants are asked 10 questions and must answer 6 correctly: Citizenship Question List.
  • CPR’s Sarah Hughes talks with Dr. Paramjit Joshi, with the International Center to Heal Our Children at the Children’s National Medical Center in Washington D.C. Learn more.
  • The ACLU of Colorado is suing Jefferson County Sheriff Ted Mink for keeping a Latino immigrant, named Luis Quezada, in jail for nearly two months without charges.
  • There are just a few short weeks left in the legislative session. State lawmakers have to make some big decisions about how K-12 schools and colleges and universities are financed. They’re also considering a bill that could result in more requirements for new charter schools.
  • Sarah Hughes reports on a new recess coach at school in Denver. She also talks to Dorothy Singer, of Yale University, who has studied children and play.
  • For as little as $750 a month, sheepherders live without running water and electricity, and go days without seeing another person.A new report says they should be treated better.Sarah Hughes talks with rancher Kip Farmer of Hotchkiss, and Jennifer Lee of Colorado Legal Services.
  • Sarah Hughes talks with Eaton School District Superintendent Randy Miller about how education funding cuts will affect his schools
  • Sarah Hughes reports on efforts to keep Jose Mendoza Turbin, an El Salvadorian immigrant, from being deported. Then Ryan Warner talks to immigration expert Muzaffar Chishti, of the Migration Policy Institute, about how ICE uses discretion in certain cases.