Peyton Manning holds the Lombardi Trophy after the Broncos won Super Bowl 50 on Feb. 7, 2016.

(AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

When Peyton Manning retired this week, he was showered with praise and warm memories by Broncos' brass. It was for good reason: Manning will be remembered as one of the best quarterbacks of all time. But his off-field legacy, and his future in Denver, are less certain.

By most accounts Manning's charitable work is extensive: He brought a fan who was dying of breast cancer to a game in Denver this season, and his PeyBack Foundation has given more than $10 million to benefit at-risk youth.

But a report in December accused he and his wife of receiving a performance-enhancing drug called human growth hormone; and allegations of an alleged incident of sexual harassment when he was a student at the University of Tennessee in the 1990s resurfaced recently. Manning has denied both using HGH and the sexual harassment allegations. 

Ben Volin covers the NFL for the Boston Globe and spoke with Colorado Matters host Nathan Heffel about Manning's "complicated" legacy, and what the quarterback could do next, from coaching to laying back and eating Papa John's Pizza from one of his franchises in Denver.