This undated photo provided by Safehouse Progressive Alliance for Nonviolence shows Deborah Ramirez. Ramirez went public with allegations that while in his first year at Yale University, Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh placed his penis in front of her and caused her to involuntarily touch it during a drunken dormitory party.

Safehouse Progressive Alliance for Nonviolence via AP

After it all, Deborah Ramirez is still glad she came forward.

That's what her attorney, John Clune, said. Ramirez accused then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct in a New Yorker story published two weeks ago. The judge was appointed to the high court in a 50-48 Senate vote this past weekend.

Ramirez was aware from the beginning that coming forward might not sway the Senate vote on Kavanaugh, Clune said.

"I don’t think that she is happy to have him on the Court, but that really wasn’t what she was focused on in this process. It was really more about getting the information in the proper hands," he said.

Clune and Ramirez did expect more from the FBI investigation, he said. In particular, he was puzzled that the agents questioned Ramirez, but did not contact any of the witnesses she provided.

"The FBI that I’ve worked with historically over my years as an attorney would’ve been a very motivated and diligent law enforcement agency," Clune said. "So it was frustrating to actually finally get the announcement of a FBI investigation, and then really see it used probably more to give cover to the confirmation process rather than actually finding out what did or didn’t happen."

Clune said he believes the last couple of weeks have shown progress being made on behalf of women who've come forward to say they were sexually assaulted.

"I think at the end of the day, we were at least able to get Debbie's voice out there and give people the opportunity to do with it what they want," Clune said.