A woman places a stone, Monday Oct. 29, 2018, on a memorial outside the Tree of Life Synagogue, to one of the 11 people killed when a gunman opened fire during worship at the temple on Saturday in Pittsburgh. 

Gene J. Puska/AP Photo

There's a lot of anger in politics these days, and a lot of division in the country. Can people be brought together to work out differences? Is that even the right approach? What's an "allergy to difference," and how does that manifest itself? What would be a better and deeper way of connecting to each other? We asked Sarah Pessin, a professor of philosophy and Jewish thought, and chair of the Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Denver. 

On Election Day, Pessin is hosting "Rising Tides of Hate: A Panel and Conversation." Its goal is to "respond and think together about where we are as a country and what we can do to stem this rising tide of hatreds." Visit Sarah's website and learn more about her "Hate and Protect" and other work.