The non-native tamarisk tree has been vilified in the west, for all sorts of things:  clogging riverbanks, crowding out other species,  but -- most of all -- for being a water hog. To get rid of tamarisk, scientists have turned to low tech strategies, like letting goats have at it, and high tech approaches, like mapping it by satellite. Many millions have been spent to eliminate the plant. But it could be getting a bum wrap when it comes to its reputation as a water guzzler. A new federal study finds tamarisk doesn't necessarily drink up more than native species. And that finding might just cause some to re-think whether costly projects to remove the plants is good policy. Anna Sher is a biology professor at University of Denver, and she's one of the worlds foremost tamarisk experts. She speaks with Ryan Warner.