In this March 25, 2014 photo, heat from machinery distorts the air as a worker watches over a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Corp. oil well near Mead in Weld County, Colorado.

(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

A Colorado county has lifted its temporary ban on new permits for oil and gas drilling after voters last week rejected a ballot proposal to restrict new wells.

The Denver Post reports that by a 3-1 vote Tuesday, the Adams County commissioners lifted the temporary ban that had been imposed on Oct. 30.

The moratorium had been passed before the outcome was known about Proposition 112, a ballot measure that would have dramatically increased the setbacks for oil and gas wells from buildings and waterways.

The county imposed the temporary ban because it was concerned that had the measure passed, there could have been an influx of new permits from companies trying to get approval before the new setbacks became law.

Almost 60 percent of Adams County voters rejected the 2,500 foot setback.

Eva Henry was the only county commissioner who voted against the early end to the moratorium.

"If you're pro-fracking or anti-fracking, it doesn't belong 500 feet from a home. However, we do have to take a look at how the election ended up with 112," Henry said.