Barista Eviana Dan holds espresso beans at Millcreek Coffee Roasters during National Coffee Day, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015, in Salt Lake City. 

(AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

It's well-known that caffeine can cause the jitters, but for teenagers the effects of caffeine consumption can be long-lasting. 

Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder put caffeine in the drinking water of adolescent mice and then observed them into adulthood.  Their findings, published recently in the journal Psychoneurendocrinology suggest caffeine may increase an adolescent's vulnerability to developing psychiatric disorders.

Ryan Bachtell, an assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience at CU-Boulder, led the study. He spoke with Colorado Matters host Andrea Dukakis.