Figurines are depicted in an embrace as part of the wedding cake display at Masterpiece Cakeshop in Denver, Thursday, June 6, 2013.

 (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Colorado’s Supreme Court will not take up the case of a Christian baker who refused to make a wedding cake for a gay couple, leaving in place a lower court finding that the baker broke the law.

Lawyers for baker Jack Phillips say they’re “evaluating all legal options” after the state Supreme Court announced Monday that it won’t hear his appeal.

"Jack, who has happily served people of all backgrounds for years, simply exercised the long-cherished American freedom to decline to use his artistic talents to promote a message and event with which he disagrees," said Alliance Defending Freedom Senior Counsel Jeremy Tedesco.

A lower court found that Phillips violated the civil rights of a gay couple -- David Mullins and Charlie Craig -- who came to his Lakewood bakery seeking a wedding cake four years ago. Phillips says he should not have to use his artistic talents to celebrate something that violates his religious beliefs.

Ria Mar, who represents the couple, said that allowing companies to deny some services to gay and lesbian couples violates Colorado’s Anti-Discrimination Act.

“We all have a right to our personal beliefs, but we do not have a right to impose those beliefs on others and discriminate against them," said Mar, staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union’s LGBT Project.

The court has ordered Phillips to make wedding cakes for couples regardless of their orientation. Instead, Phillips has said he will just stop doing any wedding-related business.