Internet Streaming and Internet Radio

I do not receive KCFR and KVOD radio signals. How can I listen on the Internet?

If your computer has an Internet connection and speakers, it's easy to listen to KCFR and KVOD. Simply go to the kvod.org or the kcfr.org website and click on the appropriate “listen” button. You will be taken to a web page that will give you three options:

  • Windows Media – this is the most common streaming software, and works even with dial-up connections. You must have Windows Media loaded on your computer in order to listen to this stream. Most computers come with this software already loaded.
  • MP3 – this service requires a broadband cable or DSL Internet connection. Most computers have the software already loaded to receive this stream.
  • OGG Vorbis – Ogg Vorbis is an open source codec that is less "lossy" than MP3 and is rated as having better quality than MP3 in listener tests. Ogg Vorbis capable players come standard on most Linux distributions and players are available for Windows and Mac platforms.

I do not have a computer. Can I still listen to KVOD and KCFR over the Internet?

Yes. Recent advances in technology have led to the production of “Internet radios.” These devices look a lot like regular radios, except that they work with wireless Internet connections. If you have access to a wireless Internet signal (WiFi) in your home or office, you can most likely use one of these radios to listen to our programming. NOTE: If your WiFi signal is encrypted (password protected), you may need assistance from someone familiar with this technology when setting up your radio the first time.

The NPR Shop carries a variety of internet radios. You can also find Internet radios at Listen Up, CPR's Audio Partner, with locations in Denver and Boulder.

My OGG Vorbis stream interrupts every few seconds.  What is wrong?

We have noticed on certain players (VLC especially) that our process of updating the current playlist causes problems of this sort.  We recommend that you use our OGG stream without playlist info (KVOD   KCFR) or to try one of our recommended OGG capable players.

Can I listen to your stations on a portable device?

Yes. Both Verizon and Sprint offer broadcast smartphones capable of receiving our Internet radio feeds. These devices also function as personal digital assistant (PDA) and cell phone. With these devices, you can listen to our Windows Media streams – and take KVOD and KCFR with you just about wherever you go. Because the smartphone devices use cell phone technology to connect to the Internet, they generally work wherever the cell phone signals reach. NOTE: Cell phone companies charge a monthly fee for their smartphone service. If you intend to use one of these phones to listen to KVOD or KCFR over the Internet on a frequent basis, consider selecting your provider’s unlimited wireless data plan to avoid excess charges.

Can I listen to your stations on my iPhone?

Yes, there are currently several applications found in the itunes store for streaming radio to your iPhone.  The most popular in the public broadcasting world right now is called Public Radio Tuner and can be downloaded  free of charge from itunes.
Click here to learn more

Can I listen to your stations on my BlackBerry?

Yes, we have test BlackBerry streams for both of our services.
To access these streams, simply go to the KCFR and KVOD listening pages. Under "MP3" you will see a link for the Blackberry stream.
Note: Please make sure you are using the most recent version of the OS before trying to connect.
This is confirmed to work with T-Mobile service on a BlackBerry Pearl using device software 4.2, and a BlackBerry Curve 8900 with device software 4.6 (unknown carrier).

When will I be able to listen to Internet radio in my car?

Work is currently underway on a new technology called WiMax, a high-speed broadcast cellular service that can be used in a mobile environment. While it is difficult to predict when a new technology like this will be deployed in automobiles as standard or optional equipment, experts anticipate that by the end of this decade, your automobile should be able to receive thousands of Internet radio stations just as easily as you tune to AM, FM, or satellite radio stations today. Many cars now have a radio jack that will allow you to connect your MP3 player or the audio from your smartphone to your car radio.

I have technical questions about listening to Colorado Public Radio with an Internet radio.  Where do I go? 

We would be happy to answer your questions about Internet radio.  Just click on this link to ask a question.