Purplish is CPR News' podcast about state politics, state government, Colorado policy, and political identity. In a new special season, the team is diving deep into redistricting -- how Colorado's political lines are being redrawn, what will change, and who benefits. Hosted by public affairs reporters Caitlyn Kim, Bente Birkeland and Andrew Kenney.
Releases on Wednesday and Friday mornings

Latest Episodes

  • It's one of the most passionate fault-lines in state politics: how to balance the authority of parents with the need to protect children and advance society's interests. And people at the Capitol have a LOT to say about it.
    A rally outside the Capitol on the first day of the 2020 legislative session. Jan. 8, 2020.A rally outside the Capitol on the first day of the 2020 legislative session. Jan. 8, 2020.
  • We're a month into session, and Capitol newbie Andrew Kenney is starting to realize it's not all pithy quotes and snappy debates. Lawmakers are getting to wrestle with some of the session's most contested proposals.
    <p>Oliver Ramirez, a 15-month-old, receives a shot during an appointment at Children's Hospital Colorado.</p>
<p>Oliver Ramirez, a 15-month-old, receives a shot during an appointment at Children's Hospital Colorado.</p>
  • Should Colorado keep the death penalty? As lawmakers once again debate abolition, it's a question that divides parties, and friends, at the state capitol.
    In this March 2013 photo, state Rep. Rhonda Fields, D-Aurora, speaks at a podium during a debate inside the Colorado State Legislature, in Denver.In this March 2013 photo, state Rep. Rhonda Fields, D-Aurora, speaks at a podium during a debate inside the Colorado State Legislature, in Denver.
  • This week we're talking about some of the ways things can get personal -- very personal -- at the state capitol.
    <p>Colorado Republican State Sen. Owen Hill sits with his daughters Miette, left, and Ellis on the opening day of the 2016 Colorado Legislature, at the Capitol, in Denver, Wednesday Jan. 13, 2016. </p><p>Colorado Republican State Sen. Owen Hill sits with his daughters Miette, left, and Ellis on the opening day of the 2016 Colorado Legislature, at the Capitol, in Denver, Wednesday Jan. 13, 2016. </p>
  • Colorado’s capitol is current firmly in the hands of the Democrats, so that means smooth sailing for all their policies right? Yeah, not so much.
    State Reps. Jovan Melton (left to right), Perry Buck and Meg Froelich inform Gov. Jared Polis that the House is ready for business on The first day of the 2020 legislative session. The Colorado State Capitol. Jan. 8, 2020.State Reps. Jovan Melton (left to right), Perry Buck and Meg Froelich inform Gov. Jared Polis that the House is ready for business on The first day of the 2020 legislative session. The Colorado State Capitol. Jan. 8, 2020.
  • A lot has happened, dear podcast listener, since Sam, Bente, and Megan chatted in our final episode last year. Sam decided he needs a break from the grind of politics and moved to the eminently more cheery beat of climate change.
    State Capitol PreviewState Capitol Preview
  • Colorado’s 2019 legislative session is over. The last four months of frantic lawmaking were a test for Democrats, who took complete control of the state Capitol last November. This episode, we look back at everything they were able to achieve — and why arguments over process at times got in the way of their biggest goals. And how Republicans, who lacked the votes to block legislation, found other ways to make their voices heard. The result was a session that showed passing bills isn’t as simple as just having a majority.
    <p>As state Rep. Tom Sullivan looks on, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signs into law HB 1177 Friday, April 12, 2019, making Colorado the 15th state in the country to have a so-called "red flag" gun law. Sullivan was elected in November and was one of the bill’s sponsors. He got involved in politics after his son Alex was killed in the Aurora Theater shooting.</p>
<p>As state Rep. Tom Sullivan looks on, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signs into law HB 1177 Friday, April 12, 2019, making Colorado the 15th state in the country to have a so-called "red flag" gun law. Sullivan was elected in November and was one of the bill’s sponsors. He got involved in politics after his son Alex was killed in the Aurora Theater shooting.</p>
  • Ken Crumb’s story likely sounds familiar. A Front Range resident sees oil and gas drilling in his community. He doesn’t like it and organizes his neighbors to pass a local drilling ban. The thing is, in Ken’s case, this all happened more than 30 years ago. And that community he rallied was Greeley -- not exactly a hotbed of anti-fracking sentiment today. This episode, we look back at perhaps Colorado’s first fractivist. What Ken did ended up limiting local control of oil and gas development. Now, Democratic lawmakers have passed a bill to tilt the scales back in the other direction.
    <p>A lone pump jack in a field south of Dacono, April 2, 2019.</p>
<p>A lone pump jack in a field south of Dacono, April 2, 2019.</p>

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