Former Colorado Rockies Shortstop Troy Tulowitzki Announces Retirement

Colorado Rockies Troy Tulowitzki grounds out to third base for the final out of a 4-2 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates in July 2014.Colorado Rockies Troy Tulowitzki grounds out to third base for the final out of a 4-2 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates in July 2014.Gene J. Puskar/AP Photo
Colorado Rockies Troy Tulowitzki grounds out to third base for the final out of a 4-2 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates in July 2014.

Five-time All-Star shortstop and former Colorado Rockies player Troy Tulowitzki announced his retirement Thursday.

He is retiring from Major League Baseball after injuries that limited him to 13 plate appearances since July 2017. He played in only five games with the New York Yankees this season before straining his left calf on April 3.

“For as long as I can remember, my dream was to compete at the highest level as a Major League Baseball player to wear a big league uniform and play hard for my teammates and the fans,” he said in a statement issued by the Yankees before a series against Boston. “I will forever be grateful for every day that I’ve had to live out my dream. It has been an absolute honor.”

Tulowitzki played for the Rockies from 2006-15 and was traded to Toronto in the middle of 2015. He then spent most of 2017 on the disabled list with ankle injuries. In April 2018, he had surgery on both heels and missed all of last season. The Yankees signed him in the offseason, and he won the shortstop job in spring training. But Tulowitzki lasted just five games before going on the injured list after straining his left calf.

“Even though injuries cut him short a little bit, it was a great career,” Yankees manager Aaron Boone said. “What I’ll remember is obviously a great player and a guy that played shortstop, a great shortstop, but played it in such a unique way and with a flair. ... He looked at home out there playing shortstop.”

Tulowitzki wore No. 2 in honor of Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter.

“I look forward to continuing my involvement in the game that I love... instructing and helping young players to achieve their goals and dreams,” he wrote. “I’m saying goodbye to Major League Baseball, but I will never say goodbye 2 the game I love. Thanks again 2 all of you!”