Hosted by Ryan Warner and Chandra Thomas Whitfield, CPR News' daily interview show focuses on the state's people, issues and ideas.
Airs Monday-Friday: 9 a.m.-10 a.m. & 7 p.m.-8 p.m.; Sundays: 10 a.m.-noon
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Latest Episodes

  • Your family dog could help cure cancer in humans. That's because dogs can develop the same types of cancer as humans. We learn about efforts in Colorado to combine cancer researchers from the medical and veterinary worlds. Then, a uniquely carved symbol has survived four massive renovations to Denver's Union Station. It's part of the station's history told in a new book. Also, the science behind pairing beer with food. We go inside Colorado's Spelling Bee. And, we're starting to keep track of who Colorado newcomers should follow on Twitter.
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  • Today, the story of Holocaust survivor Walter Plywaski. He's 86 years old and lives in Boulder -- now. His happy childhood in Poland was turned upside down the day his father's friends turned on the family and ordered them into a ghetto: "Here we were in the stinkiest, oldest, rottenest, barbed-wire surrounded environment with not enough food, not enough education, not enough of anything." Then, it was onto the camps. Plywaski made it out Auschwitz and eventually made it to the U.S. by stowing away on a ship. He tells us his story.
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  • Terrorists have to find a way to pay the bills, and a Colorado-based company tracks how ISIS gets and spends its money -- even down to the salaries of fighters. Also, Denver clears a homeless camp it says threatened people's health and safety. And, now that combat roles are open to women, Congress is weighing whether they should have to register with the Selective Service as men do. But two Colorado congressmen say want to do away with selective service entirely. And, we go inside a play about three generations of Hispanic military veterans.
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  • The black market for marijuana has shrunk considerably in Colorado since the drug became legal here. But less so in Washington State, where recreational sales are also legal. So what's the difference? We'll talk with an editor at The Economist who's dug into "narconomics." Then, the challenges of being a young farmer in the West. We'll hear from one who's making a go of it. And, it's been a real rollercoaster ride for Yankees first baseman Greg Bird, who went to high school in Aurora. He talks about the highs of being called a "phenomenon" while he substituted in the majors, and the lows of an injury and being sent back to the minors.
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  • Colorado created drivers licenses for immigrants living in the country illegally several years ago. But the issue is hardly settled, with Republicans at the state Capitol calling it backdoor amnesty and limiting the program. We'll debate its future. Then, a report last spring showed that male full professors at Colorado State University made 16 percent more than their female counterparts. While investigating this issue, Nick Coltrain of the Coloradoan in Fort Collins also raised questions about above-average raises for administrators.
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  • After voters vented on the CPR News Facebook page about long lines and other frustrations Tuesday night, we spoke with the leader of the Democratic Party in Colorado, Rick Palacio about what happened. He says Colorado may have outgrown presidential caucuses, and he will continue to push for a primary. Then, immigrants in Colorado can expect to wait 933 days for a hearing at Denver's immigration court. Why? And, what does it mean for people whose cases may not be heard for years. Also, a new thrift store has opened in Denver, staffed by teens who used to be homeless. Finally, we hear about Colorado bands in NPR's Tiny Desk Competition, and an encore piece about a local boy's lemonade stand business.
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  • Bernie Sanders won the Democrats' Colorado caucus Tuesday night, and The Political Junkie, former NPR political editor Ken Rudin, puts the Colorado headlines in national context. Then, more police officers wear body cameras to help build trust with their communities, but the cameras are not used consistently from Denver to Durango. We'll hear about an effort to change that. Also, a Colorado Rockies shortstop is the first player to run afoul of Major League Baseball's new domestic violence policy. And, we'll hear why a busy restaurant is completely dark -- on purpose.
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  • Today, one woman's crusade to make Montrose, on the Western Slope, "the most veteran friendly community in America." Then, the state doesn't want wolves intentionally released into the wild here, but could they be wandering in on their own? Also, an unusually fertile snow leopard at the zoo in Colorado Springs has researchers wondering what that means for humans. And, a private school in Denver is taking a unique approach to teach students about dementia.
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Staff