Carl Bilek

Carl joined Colorado Public Radio in 2018. He brought with him nearly 30 years of experience in the broadcast news industry, all of which was spent covering news in Denver.

Professional Background:

Most recently, he was National Director of Content at the E.W. Scripps Company, where he helped manage the “Now” show for stations across the country.

Carl has extensive experience in leadership roles for local newsrooms. He was formerly the acting news director and executive producer at KMGH, and was also the news director at KWGN.

Awards:

After 25 years of service dedicated to excellence, Carl was inducted into the Silver Circle of the NATAS Heartland Region in 2017. He also received four regional Emmy Awards for his work on special projects at KMGH, and was a part of the station’s leadership when it won the Emmy for both news excellence and station excellence.

Education:

Bachelor’s degree in communications with a minor in marketing from Metropolitan State University of Denver

  • They're the "missing middle." People who can't afford to rent or buy in Denver and other parts of Colorado and people who can't find a place to live in the first place. What's the cause? And what are some solutions? Denverite's housing reporter Donna Bryson gathered a panel to get perspective. This is an excerpt of that panel discussion which was held in front of an audience in the Curious Theatre in Denver.
    worker toils on new construction in denver, r m, housing, real estate, construction, economyworker toils on new construction in denver, r m, housing, real estate, construction, economy
  • A former Denver poet laureate and award-winning author died Monday. Chris Ransick was 57. He had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year. One of his friends told the Denver Post, Ransick was "just a real mensch"-- Yiddish for a good guy. We spoke with Ransick several times over the years. He reflected on one his works, "Poem For A Cold Walk Home," set in winter. He also shared a cherished moment from his childhood in New York. Ransick talked about the power of words and his love of writing. Ransick taught English and Creative Writing for more than two decades in Colorado and was Denver's Poet Laureate from 2006 to 2010. He won a Colorado Book Award for Poetry for his first book, "Never Summer," published in 2002. His wife Shannon and his children, Sean and Kelsey, were by his side when he died.
  • You don't have to live in Denver to be affected by its transportation issues. From finding a parking spot, to getting around on light rail, or mapping a bike-friendly route. So it's notable that the city wants to create a new Department of Transportation and Infrastructure. Voters will decide if it's the right route this election. David Sachs is covering the issue for Denverite, which is part of CPR News.
    denver downtown, backed up interstate 25 traffic, r mdenver downtown, backed up interstate 25 traffic, r m
  • People are asking if the layoffs have anything to do with Senate Bill 181. That’s contributing to a debate raging now: How much has 181 impacted Colorado companies? Preliminary data suggests not much.
    A pipes that a drill rig will send deep into the Earth on an Extraction Oil and Gas fracking pad in Broomfield, Sept. 13, 2019.A pipes that a drill rig will send deep into the Earth on an Extraction Oil and Gas fracking pad in Broomfield, Sept. 13, 2019.
  • He's known as "the Jackie Robinson of Classical Music." During segregation, he played bass in what became the Colorado Symphony. Charlie Burrell paved the way for other African-American musicians in the United States. On Friday, October 4, the Colorado Symphony celebrates Burrell's 99th birthday with a special concert. This interview is from 2006 while Burrell was working on his memoir about his legacy and love for both classical and jazz music.
    They're the "missing middle." People who can't afford to rent or buy in Denver and other parts of Colorado and people who can't find a place to live in the first place. What's the cause? And what are some solutions? Denverite's housing reporter Donna Bryson gathered a panel to get perspective. This is an excerpt of that panel discussion which was held in front of an audience in the Curious Theatre in Denver.They're the "missing middle." People who can't afford to rent or buy in Denver and other parts of Colorado and people who can't find a place to live in the first place. What's the cause? And what are some solutions? Denverite's housing reporter Donna Bryson gathered a panel to get perspective. This is an excerpt of that panel discussion which was held in front of an audience in the Curious Theatre in Denver.
  • Colorado Democratic Representative Jason Crow and Steve House, the former executive director of the state GOP and Republican challenger to Crow’s congressional seat in the 2020 election, share their thoughts on the impeachment inquiry into President Trump.
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  • What happens when a woman is raped, but police don't believe her, and even charge her with false reporting? That's the premise behind "Unbelievable," a Netflix series that premieres Friday. The series is based on a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation by ProPublica called, "An Unbelievable Story of Rape." T. Christian Miller co-wrote the article in 2015, with Ken Armstrong, a reporter at The Marshall Project, which covers criminal justice. Their story includes top notice police work in Colorado, which was critical to the arrest of a serial rapist. Colorado Matters spoke with T. Christian Miller when his report was first published.
  • The authors of The Denver Accord call it "an evidence-based road map to reduce gun violence in the United States." Devin Hughes is the founder of GVPedia, short for "Gun Violence Pedia." It's behind the accord. He spoke with Colorado Matters host Ryan Warner about this issue.
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  • Governor Jared Polis has pledged to power Colorado on 100% renewable energy. And, the state's largest utility, Xcel Energy, has set a goal of providing only carbon-free power. That leaves the door open to a number of non-renewable, yet carbon-free energy sources, including nuclear power.
    Gary Wiederspoon has worked at the former nuclear power plant, Fort St. Vrain since 1984. He shows off his name badge in front of the building in Platteville, Colo.Gary Wiederspoon has worked at the former nuclear power plant, Fort St. Vrain since 1984. He shows off his name badge in front of the building in Platteville, Colo.
  • Cruising down Federal Boulevard in Denver is a tradition that dates back decades. Now, cruisers plan to make a cultural statement by holding a formal celebration that even got a city proclamation. Denverite's Esteban Hernandez has been reporting on what's led up to this event.
    Ben Chavez gives a guy a ride in his Cadillac around the Twin Lakes block where he lived as a kid. Aug. 14, 2019.Ben Chavez gives a guy a ride in his Cadillac around the Twin Lakes block where he lived as a kid. Aug. 14, 2019.
  • Just because a building withstands an earthquake doesn't mean it's safe to go back into, especially older buildings. Engineer Abbie Liel, of CU Boulder, is trying to solve this problem through retrofits. She recently received a grant from the National Institute of Standards and Technology to help make that happen.
    They're the "missing middle." People who can't afford to rent or buy in Denver and other parts of Colorado and people who can't find a place to live in the first place. What's the cause? And what are some solutions? Denverite's housing reporter Donna Bryson gathered a panel to get perspective. This is an excerpt of that panel discussion which was held in front of an audience in the Curious Theatre in Denver.They're the "missing middle." People who can't afford to rent or buy in Denver and other parts of Colorado and people who can't find a place to live in the first place. What's the cause? And what are some solutions? Denverite's housing reporter Donna Bryson gathered a panel to get perspective. This is an excerpt of that panel discussion which was held in front of an audience in the Curious Theatre in Denver.
  • The investigation into the fatal police shooting of an African-American teen in Colorado Springs continues to raise questions about what happened. The autopsy report shows 19-year-old De'Von Baily was shot three times in the back as he ran from officers, and once in the back of the arm. On Thursday, the police department released body camera footage of that foot chase and shooting. CPR's Southern Colorado reporter Dan Boyce updates the case. Then, it's up to the District Attorney to decide whether any officers should be charged. For perspective on what goes into that kind of decision, Mitch Morrissey is here with us. He was Denver's elected District Attorney for 12 years, and spent a total of 34 years in the DA's office.
    De'von Bailey Police Shooting Memorial Mourners Colorado SpringsDe'von Bailey Police Shooting Memorial Mourners Colorado Springs
  • A vigil to honor those killed on the roads will be held Wednesday in Denver. Not just cyclists and pedestrians will be remembered, but motorists and bikers as well. Jack Todd of Bicycle Colorado speaks to Colorado Matters ahead of the event about the challenges and dynamics of safety on the roads.
    <p>Bike commuters in Denver June 12, 2019.</p>
<p>Bike commuters in Denver June 12, 2019.</p>
  • People have a lot of good intentions when it comes to wildlife. But when people try to help a wild animal, they often end up doing more harm than good. Sometimes the interaction erodes the animal’s natural fear of humans. Other times it puts the animal’s life at risk directly.
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  • Life in Hong Kong is changing fast. So fast that a Colorado man says he barely recognizes it, despite living there for nearly 20 years. His main concern, which is shared by many in Hong Kong, is that China is taking away its independence. He was there for one of the recent protests.
    2019 demonstrations in Hong Kong2019 demonstrations in Hong Kong
  • The Red Cross is offering first responder training to faith leaders, who often provide spiritual and physical care after disasters.