Megan Verlee is an editor with Colorado Public Radio. She joined CPR in 2008 and has worked as a general assignment reporter and legislative reporter.

Professional background:
Megan Verlee joined Colorado Public Radio in the spring of 2008, just in time to report on Colorado’s important role in the presidential election. As the station’s general assignment reporter she covered everything from conservation programs on the eastern plains to natural gas development on the Western Slope.

Before coming to CPR, Megan spent several years reporting for public radio station WHQR in Wilmington, North Carolina. She got her professional start at NPR, editing and producing for “Morning Edition” and “Talk of the Nation.” Her work has appeared on numerous national radio programs and in several magazines.

Education:
Bachelor’s degree in sociology, Columbia University.

Awards:
Since joining CPR, Megan has won a number of awards, including first place from the Colorado Broadcasters Association for the “Biography of a Bill” series and a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Best Use of Sound in the 2012 “Getting Hands on at Colorado Gators.” She also received an award from the Associated Press for use of sound in a story about people raising livestock in urban areas.

In 2013, Megan’s story about Fairplay’s world championship pack burro racing took home a PRNDI Award for Best Nationally Edited Soft Feature, and she also participated in the State Integrity Investigation, which won a 2013 national Edward R. Murrow Award for Network Radio Investigative Reporting.

Prior to joining CPR, Megan received six regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for her work at WHQR in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Q & A

Why did you become a journalist?
I took my first radio class freshman year of high school and was hooked. For one assignment I had to interview other students about their experiences with the school. We had just been through Rodney King and O.J. Simpson, and in my angry, highly divided urban school, students of different races did not talk to each other. But when I had a microphone in my hand, everyone would talk to me. In two weeks of interviews I learned things about life in my school I never would have otherwise. I knew then I always wanted to have that power to ask questions, and the privilege to hear people’s answers.

How did you get into radio?
It’s always been radio for me. I’ve done some magazine work in recent years for the fun of it, but really, I’m crazy about sound; it engages your imagination in ways I don’t think either print or video can.

How did you end up at CPR?
Both my parents are from Colorado and so even though I was raised in California, I’ve long thought of the state as home. Reporting’s what I’ve always wanted to do and Colorado’s where I’ve always wanted to live. It just took a while for the job and the geography to align.

  • For many in Colorado, Labor Day weekend marks the beginning of a shift from one recreation season to the next.  Summer activities like mountain biking and backpacking may be winding down, but stores that sell recreation equipment say sales continue to climb.
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  • The livestock industry is broken, but there’s not much agreement about what exactly is wrong, or how to fix it — that was the overall theme of a major hearing with Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Attorney General Eric Holder in Fort Collins Friday.
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  • Durango resident Tom Grams knew the risks when he went to Afghanistan to provide dental care in a remote part of the country.  Those fears were realized last Thursday when Taliban rebels attacked the convoy that he was traveling with.  All ten medical volunteers were killed.  Dylan Norton was one of Grams’ closest friends in

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  • The US is losing its cattle operations.  In the past three decades, 41% of the nation’s ranchers got out of the business.  And today four companies control a crucial aspect of the industry — meatpacking.
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  • Colorado’s Tea Party flexed its muscle in Tuesday’s primary, pushing two of its candidates — Ken Buck and Dan Maes — to top Republican spots.  On the Democrat side, voters chose incumbent Michael Bennet over Andrew Romanoff.
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  • Hundreds of cycling enthusiasts turned out at the state capitol Wednesday to hear Governor Bill Ritter and champion racer Lance Armstrong announce the return of pro racing to Colorado.  Thirteen months from now, teams from the U.S. and around the world will take to the roads for the first Quiznos Pro Challenge.
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  • The national Libertarian Party began in Colorado almost 40 years ago. It’s never had a primary in the state until now. On August 10th Libertarian voters will pick their candidate for governor, U.S. Senate and first Congressional District which includes Denver.
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  • In grocery stores around the state you can find signs highlighting food from Colorado. Some even tout farmer bios — showing off their local cred.  But one new shop is taking the ‘eat local’ trend to an extreme.
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  • Yard signs… political rallies… attack ads.  Election season is in full swing in Colorado.  Before you find that mail-in ballot in your mailbox, Colorado Matters is bringing you up to speed on the major races.  We’re talking with the candidates for Senate and Governor.  And we kick off the coverage with a conversation with Colorado

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  • In our summer series, Backyard Farmers, we’re talking trash — banana peels, coffee grounds, yard clippings, all that icky stuff most of us throw away without thinking.  Organic waste makes around half of what cities send to their landfills.  But that could change, as cities begin to embrace large scale composting programs.  Before that can

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  • All this week injured veterans of every war since Vietnam are competing inthe 30th Annual National Veterans Wheelchair Games in Denver.
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  • On July 1st, Denver kicks off what officials hope will be an enduring new event for the city:  The Biennial of the Americas.  This art show and cultural happening is being billed as a celebration of the Western Hemisphere.  But by setting its goals so broadly, the event may have lost its original audience.
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  • Colorado’s medical marijuana dispensaries are gearing up fornew regulations.  But those changes may well affect somepeople who haven’t been going by the rules: dealers selling on the black market.Colorado Public Radio’s Megan Verlee looks at the economics of staying underground.
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  • Of all the statewide offices up for relection this year, Attorney General holdsa rare distinction — with no primary challenges, voters already know which twocandidates will face off in  November.  Last night those two men met fortheir first debate.  CPR’s Megan Verlee reports.
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  • Backyard Farmers: The group Growing Colorado Kids started out to teach gardening skills to refugee youth in Denver, but organizers say they’ve ended up learning a whole lot more.
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  • State economists say Colorado is still on the road to recovery, but it’s goingto be a bumpy ride getting there… and that’s bad news for the state budget.  Anew budget forecast released Monday shows the governor will still have a shortfall to make up next year.  CPR’s Megan Verlee reports.
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