Buck And Neguse Have Courtside Seats For The House Judiciary’s Impeachment Hearing

December 3, 2019
Fiona Hill, David HolmesFiona Hill, David HolmesAndrew Harnik/AP
Former White House national security aide Fiona Hill, second from left, and David Holmes, second from right, a U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, stand behind their chairs as they arrive to testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019.

In a hearing that is expected to be more academic than blockbuster, two of Colorado’s Congress members — one from each side of the aisle —  will become part of political history on Wednesday, when the House Judiciary Committee begins its part of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. 

Reps. Ken Buck, a Republican, and Joe Neguse, a Democrat, both sit on the Judiciary Committee. The two will get an opportunity to question four legal experts — three chosen by Democrats, one by Republicans — on what is an impeachable offense. 

Buck, who represents the state’s 4th District and heads the Colorado GOP, described the testimony out of the Intelligence Committee as hearsay, and the process as flawed and unfair.

“I think it’s a bad idea for the president to participate,” Buck told Fox News on Monday. “This was never a fair hearing. It’s not been set up as a fair hearing and I think it would be a mistake.”

Buck argued that the facts thus far don’t rise to the level of impeachable conduct.

Neguse, who represents Colorado's 2nd District, has called for an impeachment inquiry since this spring. He has argued that no one, including the president, is above the law. 

The evidence, Neguse said, shows the president abused his power for political gain. And he has said the rules in place “comport with the due process and fairness considerations that one would expect” in this type of process. 

Neguse will be rushing back from a Congressional leadership trip to a UN Climate Conference in Madrid, Spain, to take part in the hearing. 

This will be the first time a Coloradan representative, let alone two, sits on the Judiciary Committee during an impeachment inquiry. The committee is responsible for drafting up articles of impeachment. 

The two men's questions will likely highlight the difference of opinion between Democrats and Republicans about whether the actions president trump is accused of are or are not grounds for impeachment.