How A Town Evolves As Coal Goes Away; The Western Slope Fight Against The Popular Vote

June 21, 2019
<p>Owner Paola Legarre walks through her lavender rows on her Palisade farm on June 19, 2019.</p>
<p>Owner Paola Legarre walks through her lavender rows on her Palisade farm on June 19, 2019.</p>
<p><span style="font-size: 13.008px;">Stephanie Wolf/CPR News</span></p>
Owner Paola Legarre walks through her lavender rows on her Palisade farm on June 19, 2019.

The tiny towns of Nucla and Naturita work to outlast energy booms and busts. Then, Mesa County Commissioner Rose Pugliese challenges the national popular vote movement. Next, why do Grand Valley streets have fractions? Also, lavender takes root in the Western Slope. Then, a teenage goat tying champion. Finally, meet musician Donny Morales.