Andrea Dukakis

Andrea Dukakis is a producer/reporter/host for Colorado Matters on CPR News. She has produced and reported for CPR for nearly two decades. Prior to joining CPR, Andrea worked at NPR and ABC News.

Education:
Bachelor’s degree in English, Princeton University; Master’s degree in journalism, Columbia University.

Professional background:
Andrea Dukakisreports, produces and hosts stories for Colorado Public Radio and has been at CPR for nearly two decades.Prior to coming to Colorado, she spent three years at National Public Radio in Washington, D.C. Andrea has also worked at ABC News in New York. She’s reported national stories for several NPR programs, including “Morning Edition,” “All Things Considered,” “Justice Talking” and “Living on Earth,” as well as for BBC’s “The World.”

Awards:
Andrea has received awards from PRNDI (Public Radio News Directors Incorporated),Colorado Broadcasters Association, Associated Press and the Colorado Community Health Network.


Q & AWhy I became a journalist:
I have always been fascinated by people and their unique experiences, and I love the news. So, it was a perfect fit. I grew up in a political family, and we always talked about issues and politics at the dinner table. But I never wanted to work in politics – I always preferred understanding issues from different perspectives. I think the most powerful stories are the ones told by those who are affected, whether it be health care reform, welfare, education, justice issues or the economy. And, I enjoy telling those stories.

Why I got into radio:
While I was in journalism school, I was offered the chance to help out at WBAI – a public radio station in New York City. I had written a story for school on Amerasian children who moved here from Vietnam after the war. The folks at WBAI let me turn it into a radio story – and I was hooked. I liked it better than print because radio adds a special texture to a story. And I preferred radio to television because I think people being interviewed are more honest when they talk into a microphone, rather than a camera.

How I ended up at CPR:
I was newly married, and my husband wanted to move to the mountains. At the time, I was at National Public Radio in Washington, D.C. We moved to Denver, and I began talking to people at Colorado Public Radio. It was really the only place I wanted to work – and the rest is history.

  • The longest serving Chief Justice of the Colorado Supreme Court is retiring. Mary Mullarkey has been Chief Justice for 12 years. She was first appointed to the court in 1987 by Democratic Governor Roy Romer. Justice Mullarkey has Multiple Sclerosis, but continues to maintain a full schedule.
  • Tonight at 6, we’ll carry the president’s address on the Gulf oil spill live from the Oval Office. As we’ve been hearing this morning, Mr. Obama is expected to call for an independent group to handle claims from people whose livelihoods have been affected by the spill. For now, BP is handling claims.
  • In this state, studies still show there’s not equal pay for equal work. Women and minorities continue to make less on average than their white and male counterparts. Now, a new law creates a permanent commission to look at pay equity in Colorado.
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  • A case out of Denver is helping protect prisoners across the country from being abused by guards. Amanda Hall was an inmate at the Denver Women’s Correctional Facility. Over the course of 5 months, a guard named LeShawn Terrell forced her to have sex.
  • When juveniles are charged as adults, they may spend many months in jail… awaiting trial or a transfer. During that time, their education pretty much grinds to a halt.  Lawmakers passed a bill to change that this session… no word from Governor Bill Ritter’s office whether he’ll sign it.
  • Four wealthy Democrats– who didn’t like where the state was headed — were instrumental in changing Colorado from a solidly red state to one that’s a lot bluer today. And a new book reveals how they did it.
  • Research from CU Boulder finds that, even though women are better represented in the workforce these days, they’re still expected to bearthe brunt of housework and childcare duties. And those expectations are coming from both men and women.
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  • Today, the federal government released new unemployment numbers. The national unemployment rate is 9.9 percent.   But the rate for veterans who have recently returned from Iraq and Afghanistan is 13.1 percent. That’s much higher than it used to be.
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  • Last year, 9 students at Colorado State University committed suicide, the highest number recorded in its history. Typically, there are somewhere between 0 and 4 suicides. CSU officials are trying to figure out if there’s a pattern, and they’re building on existing efforts to prevent suicide.
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  • Andrea Dukakis speaks to Mike Iiams, with Alcohol Monitoring Systems of Highlands Ranch, a Colorado business that has created breakthrough technology for monitoring alcohol offenders.
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  • Andrea Dukakis speaks to Mike Iiams, with Alcohol Monitoring Systems of Highlands Ranch, a Colorado business that has created breakthrough technology for monitoring alcohol offenders.
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  • Andrea Dukakis speaks to Mike Iiams, with Alcohol Monitoring Systems of Highlands Ranch, a Colorado business that has created breakthrough technology for monitoring alcohol offenders.
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  • Andrea Dukakis speaks to Mike Iiams, with Alcohol Monitoring Systems of Highlands Ranch, a Colorado business that has created breakthrough technology for monitoring alcohol offenders.
    CPR News logo stacked 3x2CPR News logo stacked 3x2
  • Andrea Dukakis speaks to Mike Iiams, with Alcohol Monitoring Systems of Highlands Ranch, a Colorado business that has created breakthrough technology for monitoring alcohol offenders.
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  • Grassroots organizations from all sides of the health care debate are busy contacting Colorado’s delegation. CPR’s Andrea Dukakis reports.
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  • In a year of budget cuts, the governor wants to increase spending on programs that reduce recidivism. KCFR’s Andrea Dukakis reports.
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