Jon Pinnow

Daily Production Manager

[email protected]

Education:
Bachelor's degree in English and mass communications, University of Denver; Master's degree in English, University of Denver.

Professional background:
Jon worked for many years producing and recording books for the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, a program of the Library of Congress. In addition, Jon taught and worked in various administrative positions at local colleges and freelanced as a writer/editor. Through it all, the music was always playing in the background — that is, until he came to CPR in 2001.

How I became interested in music:
When I was a child, my uncle moved to Australia, leaving his classical music collection in the care of my father. For years, the records sat on a shelf gathering dust while Eddy Arnold and Herb Alpert held sway on the turntable. But idly pawing through the stack one snowy afternoon, I was suddenly drawn to my uncle's old LPs: the Mozart Requiem, the Berlin Philharmonic, Deutsche Grammophon .... Reader, I carried them all down into my bedroom that very day.

A few years later I went off to college as a music major, where I soon discovered my skills as singer and trombonist — and my dedication to improving those skills — meant I'd be better off in the English department. Still, one highlight from my time as a music student was singing in the chorus of an enormous Easter Sunday performance of the Mozart Requiem.

Why I got into radio:
A true story: As a kid, I loved to build elaborate towns out of Legos, then commute through make-believe streets in a Matchbox car to a pretend job at a pretend radio station. A few years ago, I was driving to work early one morning, in an old VW, past little quiet houses that might as well have been made of Legos, and it hit me: I'm one of the people lucky enough to live out the reality of a childhood fantasy.

How I ended up at CPR:
I was hired as writer/content developer in 2001 and worked my way through a variety of positions to the post I hold now. I'm grateful to everyone who makes possible this grand experiment we call Colorado Public Radio.

Grand Mesa

It peaks at just 11,000 feet, but as the largest flat-topped mountain in the world, and it certainly lives up to its name: Grand Mesa.  Broad and wide, Grand Mesa […]

Enos Mills

One of Colorado’s crown jewels might not exist but for a chance meeting on a beach in California. Enos Mills was only 15 when he homesteaded near Estes Park.
BENTS NEW FORT SANTA FE TRAIL ARKANSAS VALLEY HISTORY

Antipodes

Contrary to a popular expression, in this country you cannot dig a hole straight to China. Two points positioned on opposite sides of the globe are called antipodes.
olathe-sweet-corn-20230804

Olathe sweet corn

Every summer, Coloradans anticipate roasting and buttering ears of Olathe sweet corn, grown exclusively in Montrose County. But it’s more than a vegetable – it’s the crop that saved Olathe!
Boulder Flatirons

Ancestral Rockies

Before the Rocky Mountains rose from an ancient ocean, and before that ancient ocean submerged Colorado under water, there were other mountains here: The Ancestral Rocky Mountains.
Colorado Postcards

Square Dance

After a championship season, a Colorado football coach noticed a change in his players’ attitude. And so he turned the team to a more inclusive extracurricular activity: square dancing.
Hal Walter crosses the finish line with his burro Full Tilt Boogie to win 28.6-mile World Championship Pack Burro Racing Championship in Fairplay in 2013.

Burros

The beasts of burden in the Colorado mineral booms of the late 1800s were burros – the Spanish word for a small, sturdy donkey.