Cruisers On Federal, Aerial Dancing In Breckenridge, Blackpacking, Fly Fishing And More Photos Of The Week

August 30, 2019
Officer Mark Garcia poses for a portrait with his low rifer at Barnum Park after a cruise down Federal Boulevard. Aug. 25, 2019. Officer Mark Garcia poses for a portrait with his low rifer at Barnum Park after a cruise down Federal Boulevard. Aug. 25, 2019. Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite
Officer Mark Garcia poses for a portrait with his low rifer at Barnum Park after a cruise down Federal Boulevard. Aug. 25, 2019.

One big Federal Boulevard cruise recently marked a new era for a Chicano tradition. City Council recently proclaimed that the tradition is part and parcel of Denver’s cultural history. A big cruise, bookended by gatherings at Barnum and La Raza (officially Columbus) parks, was attended by Police Chief Paul Pazen and a quartet of Chicano legislators from the city and state.

Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite
Mikey Bartolo's Denver-themed low rider is parked at Barnum Park after a cruise down Federal Boulevard. Aug. 25, 2019.
Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite
From left, Stare Sen. Julie Gonzales, City Councilwomen Amanda Sandoval and Jamie Torres and State House Rep. Serena Gonzales-Gutierrez are blessed with smoke at La Raza (or Columbus) Park before a cruise down Federal Boulevard. Aug. 25, 2019.

Not all Coloradans share in the outdoor experience. Blackpackers, founded by Patricia Cameron, wants to change that: African Americans have been historically underrepresented in outdoor recreation, although studies show that beginning to change. Cameron, an outdoor writer who works part-time at an outdoor gear shop, said there are a lot of times she feels left out too.

"Be it (my) background or how I got into the outdoors or how I use the outdoors or just who I am as a black American woman,” she said. “What's awesome about this is we get to come together and we have a lot of those shared experiences just based on that.”

BlackpackersHart Van Denburg/CPR News
Jahala Walker, of Denver, at the inaugural Blackpackers camp-out Aug. 17-18 at Eleven Mile State Park west of Manitou Springs.
BlackpackersHart Van Denburg/CPR News
Carrie Austin of Aurora helps put up a tent at the Blackpackers inaugural camp-out weekend Aug. 17-18 at Eleven Mile State Park west of Manitou Springs.
BlackpackersHart Van Denburg/CPR News
Warren Tyson, left, shows his grandson Zyair Abdullah, 6, how you set bait for fishing during the Blackpackers inaugural camp out Aug. 17-18 at Eleven Mile State Park west of Manitou Springs.

BANDALOOP is known for its vertical dances on the sides of skyscrapers and mountains, as well as from famous sites such as Seattle’s Space Needle. Arts reporter Stephanie Wolf turned her gaze upwards to watch the aerial dance show at the Breckenridge International Festival of Arts.

190822 BANDALOOPSteph Wolf/CPR News
The artists of Oakland-based BANDALOOP perform on the stage, in the air and along the sides of Breckenridge’s Riverwalk Center.
190822 BANDALOOPSteph Wolf/CPR News
The artists of Oakland-based BANDALOOP perform on the stage, in the air and along the sides of Breckenridge’s Riverwalk Center.
190822 BANDALOOPSteph Wolf/CPR News
The artists of Oakland-based BANDALOOP perform on the stage, in the air and along the sides of Breckenridge’s Riverwalk Center.

Ever wonder where those Denver Boots come from? J.W. Reffel Metals is an Englewood foundry and a family business. It’s also where some of the famous, trademarked handcuffs for cars are created. Workers heat metal until its molten and then pour it into one-time use casts. They harden and cool within minutes.

Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite
Chris Wajda pours molten metal into molds at J.W. Reffel Metals' Englewood foundry, Aug. 21, 2019.
Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite
Juan Gonzalez at work inside J.W. Reffel Metals' Englewood foundry, Aug. 21, 2019.
J.W. Reffel Metals. Englewood, Aug. 21, 2019. (Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite)Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite
J.W. Reffel Metals. Englewood, Aug. 21, 2019.

We talked with the guy who took glamour shots of Denver Gold (and Broncos) coach Red Miller with a leopard. Just like everyone else, photographer Mark Kiryluk told us has no idea why Red Miller posed with his arm around a big cat predator in 1983, but thank John Elway he did, because the picture is a gift. We first came across Kiryluk’s photo for a story on Denver’s “junk sports” teams, franchises that belonged to experimental leagues looking to be the Next Big Thing. (Pro roller hockey, anyone?)

Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite
Mark Kiryluk shows out-takes from his cover shoot of Red Miller for Denver Magazine. Aug. 26, 2019.

How do you hook more women on fly-fishing? Get more women guides in the water with them. After all, Colorado is a kind of heaven for fly-fishing. It’s easy to picture fishermen in their waders, snapping a line to and fro. But if Kaitlin Boyer has her way, when you think about that scene, it’s not just men on the water

Women Flyfishing ScholarshipHart Van Denburg/CPR News
Lauren McKenzie of Colorado Springs lands her very first trout, caught on a dry fly. Flyfishing guide Kaitlin Boyer introduced McKenzie to the sport in July at South Catamount Reservoir behind Pikes Peak.
Women Flyfishing ScholarshipHart Van Denburg/CPR News
Boyer with Lauren McKenzie at South Catamount Reservoir behind Pikes Peak.
Women Flyfishing ScholarshipHart Van Denburg/CPR News
Boyer preps a fly.

Denver wants to boot the Onyx nightclub out of its 14th Street city-owned location, citing crime. District 6 Police Commander Aaron Sanchez said the police department has responded to 235 911 calls near 14th and Arapahoe since January, often because of fights. Security cameras help them spot problems.

Kevin J. Beaty/Denverite
A security camera on the corner of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts' parking structure at 14th and Arapahoe streets, Aug. 29, 2019.

The Colorado Classic is the only race of its kind, and it’s inspiring women across the state. This revamped race is now touted as the only women’s standalone pro road race in the Western Hemisphere. The 220-mile, four-stage race started in Steamboat Springs, moved to Avon, then Golden on Saturday and Denver.

Hart Van Denburg/CPR News
Defending the overall race leader's yellow jersey, American Chloe Dygert-Owen claimed four top spots Saturday Aug. 23 at the Colorado Classic bicycle race's second stage in Avon: the stage winner, overall race leader, sprint winner and queen of the mountain.
Hart Van Denburg/CPR News
The peloton in Avon..
Hart Van Denburg/CPR News
Stage winner Chloe Dygert-Owen, second-place finisher Brodie Chapman, left, and third-place finisher Omer Shapira, right, on the podium after the second day of the Colorado Classic Saturday Aug. 23 in Avon, Colorado

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